Your WA review is by far the best one I’ve seen and it helped me to decide not to re new either so Thanks! One thing that drove me crazy was that any time I would enter my site dot com I could never reach my site from ANY device ( cell phone or computer) and would simply see an error message. Yet if I clicked on the link to my site from WA’s control panel I’d reach the site. This use to drive me crazy! I had no plug ins on my site and my upline the aforementioned One more cup of Coffee dude said he had no clue and suggested typing /wp-login.php after dot com to see if that would work. I asked why in the world would I have to add /wp-login.php or expect anybody else to do that when going to my site?

If you want to help shape products in their early stages, joining an online focus group or answering survey questions is a great way to make extra money online. They don’t pay as much as some of the other options we’ve highlighted, but you can join groups on sites like Survey Junkie, Swagbucks, and IPSOS that pay out through Amazon gift cards, check, or PayPal. You’ll be asked to provide a bit of information about your demographics (age, location, etc…), but after that you can get going making money through surveys.
I then stumbled across WA, and thought hey maybe I’ll do this. But it seems to me that it might be better simply just to set up a wordpress blog and go from there. If I do want to start IM I can learn SEO all over the net. I saw that on WA you have to be a premium member to get comments on your wordpress sites however I am very sure if I set up my own WP blog I can get a plugin of some sort to have comments.
19. eBay – Of course you can’t read an article about making money online that doesn’t mention eBay. You can start an eBay store and get serious about it or you can just sell some stuff to declutter your home. Either way, I’ve made my fair share from selling on eBay and it’s still a popular way to earn money. If you decide to start an actual eBay store, you’ll want to find a drop-ship business like Doba that will store and ship items straight to your customers so you don’t have to deal with an inventory.
26. Services – You can offer a paid service, such as life coaching, blog coaching, goal setting or financial planning. Just be sure to investigate all the legal implications and make sure you’re not claiming to be a professional if you’re not one. With a service like this, you’re basically using your blog to sell yourself. You’ll need to convince people that you’re worth buying and then be able to back up your claims once they purchase your service.
27. Sponsored/paid posts – Many blogs publish sponsored and paid posts. Sponsored posts are basically just posts about a specific brand, product or service. A company will pay you to publish an article about it. It’s similar with other paid posts as well. Your basically selling the spot for the article on your site. If you decide to take this route, you’ll want to build your traffic before you will get many offers.
Great review or anti-review ??? Wish I had read this article a few months ago . I parted ways with WA around a month ago . I have been out here still pursuing my interest and it’s pretty FREAKIN rough . Just this afternoon i found myself engaged in a three hour batitle royal with Jetpack , WordPress , and the God that is Google over one post . Wealthy Affiliate is like that way cool app you’ve been wanting and the download is freeee , it’s just that , We’ll …. you need $575.00 in memberships , plug-ins and add-ons to make the damn thing work . Plus , they stole my domain !!! I been out here on my own for a month . I’ve pulled in $11 bucks . So yeah , you could say I’m Ballin. UP YOURS KYLE & CARSON !!!!!!!!!

Good news is, Wealthy Affiliate goes on to say that within the first few lessons you’re going to learn the techniques that will allow you to get an abundance, no wait…ABUNDANCE of relevant customers to your site by way of organic search. Most folks reading this have no idea just how difficult this is. If you know how to do it, then it’s mainly just hard work, but for those of you that don’t understand the process…you’re in for a long education full of trial and error.
Pro tip for first-timers: Carefully consider the pay rates that are listed. Penny Hoarder Carson Kohler has used the platform to find freelance writing gigs, and she reports low rates — like $3 for 500 written words. It’s probably not worth it. (And, yes, you’ll have to scroll through a whole lot of these low-paying listings to find the good ones.)
Now I imagine there are some highly motivated and disciplined individuals who could utilize the membership training and community resource to build a profitable businesses; however… The main sales page is a bit misleading in that I feel it grossly oversimplifies the process of establishing a profitable site, and it nowhere near emphasizes just how much work will be involved. Not to mention, the several months you will have to devote to this before you start seeing any sort of income.
I would also like to see a forum built into the platform. Wealthy Affiliate has a unique way of building a community and I understand why they shy away from a standard forum type of format. Instead, they want to promote live chat sessions, blog posts, private messaging, and public questions where people can comment below. This type of setup is pretty cool at times, but I also do enjoy forums where I can just browse by topic.
When you lack the luxury of time, making money on or offline can seem like an impossible task. How are you supposed to do that when you're working at a life-sucking nine-to-five job? While the stability of full-time employment might allow most to sleep well at night, it doesn't empower your creative juices to search for new income-producing strategies.
One thing I didn’t like is that they give no guidance as to what constitutes a good niche. They imply, if they don’t say it outright, that you can make money out of any niche, you just have to choose one you’re passionate about and money will necessarily follow. I wholeheartedly disagree. Let’s take an example. If I’m passionate about, say, jigsaw puzzles, does that make them a good niche? Sure, there are such products sold on the net and probably you can earn commissions from them, but 1) this is the sort of things people will more likely buy at brick and mortar stores, 2) most of them are not expensive enough to make significant commissions from them, and 3) most importantly, if, as they say, you must first give value and help people, how can you write tens of posts that will “help” people about jigsaw puzzles? I for one would run out of ideas before having used all fingers of one hand. And that’s also why I disagree with their suggestion to select very narrow niches. One can only write so much about so little.
Hi Craig – Correct me if I am wrong, but your information about not being able to access your website after going Premium is also misleading. Your domain name is your own and you can move it to any other hosting company. When you quit your hosting from any company — including Wealthy Affiliate — of course you can no longer access your site from there. You make it sound like your site is “lost” or somehow WA makes it “disappear” when in fact all you need to do is pay someone else to host it and move your domain. You will pay for hosting no matter what, it is often $25+ per month for not even as many features as are offered by Wealthy Affiliate. This means that for an additional $25 you can access on-going training on SEO updates, social media, and other necessary services. This seems like a deal to me. Yes, Wealthy Affiliate makes it sound easier than it is to get to the money, but I would rather that people figure out that they are not willing to do the work for a $49 loss than for a $300-$1000+ loss as is the cost of other programs.
If you design a wildly popular app (which is harder than it sounds), you might be pleasantly surprised with the income they generate. Offering one or more apps at the iTunes or Android app store gives your creations wide exposure to prospects. And income can be generated by charging for the app, displaying in-app ads, or charging for in-app features and upgrades.
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